HERMAN ADOLPH ZIOCK

HERMAN ADOLPH ZIOCK was born in 1839 in Bethanien, St. Jan and was the son of Adolf Hermann Ziock and Marie Caroline Lindemann.  In 1868 Herman (Jr.) was called to service in Laborador and left the West Indies with the trading ship "Harmony".   He served as a trader and clerk in far north Labrador at the station Hebron.   He died on July 20th, 1868 when his shotgun accidentally discharged.  He was buried in Hebron July 24, 1868.  Hermann Ziock is on the list of Moravian Missionaries in Labrador. Dr. Hans Rollman informed me that the settlement of Hebron is no longer operative but that the cemetery & grave of Herman Adolph Ziock could still be there.

5 Nov. 2001 - Received the following email:

Hello! I stumbled across your website, and wanted to let you know that
I've transcribed the tombstones from Hebron, Labrador, and placed them
online at:  http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cannf/lbnc_cem_hebron.htm

I did transcribe the tombstone for Herman Adolph Ziok (how it is spelled
on the tombstone). It reads:

Herman Adolph ZIOK geb d 9. Juli, 1839 in Emaus auf St. Jan Westindien
heimgegangen de 20 Oktober, 1868.

I hope this is of some interest!

Dale Jarvis
Heritage Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador
The Newman Building, 1 Springdale Street
PO Box 5171, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada A1C 5V5
phone: 709-739-1892  fax: 709-739-5413

http://www.heritagefoundation.ca

 

Thanks to George Brown of Cadet, Mo. for telling me about Google Earth which
is where I found the above picture from circa 1860.


 


WITH THE HARMONY TO LABRADOR

Notes Of A Visit To The Moravian Mission Stations
On The North-East Coast Of Labrador

By:  Benjamin La Trobe


 

 


Hebron, Labrador

Assorted Articles and Photos

http://www.pinetreeline.org/other/other34/other34bc.html

These are some GREAT photos!  One includes what they think is the old cemetery. This is probably where Herman Adolph is buried.  No tombstones are visible.  Dale Jarvis who sent the email above told me that the Moravians had small, flat tombstones.  So if unattended grass could easily cover them in time.